Oh My Gosh, Were Our Mothers Right?!

When we were teens we didn’t think our parents knew what they were talking about. They even tried scare tactics to harass us, didn’t they? “If you don’t stop looking like that, your face is gonna to freeze that way!” “You know there are millions of children starving in China, so you better eat that!” Yeah, yeah, send it to them.

Then, as we got older, some things gradually began to make sense. I remember standing in front of the bathroom mirror, my mom over my shoulder, telling me, “Remember sweetie, you have my side of the family’s genes, so always moisturize your neck . . . because  . . . someday it’s going to be your face.” After that, I never missed a day.

And when she  told me to slow down, she wasn’t just talking about my driving! “Will you please slow down and chew your food, it’s not good to eat so fast!”  As I continued my studies in nutrition, I discovered how right she was. Who knew?

Chewing releases enzymes.  What the heck are enzymes, you’re probably asking, and why should I care?  Glad you asked!

Imagine your body is a house that’s ready to be moved into, with the boxes piled up on the front lawn.  A moving company is waiting to place those boxed items inside the house; plates, small appliances, furniture, boxes of clothes and antiques, etc.  Food is like the boxes sitting on the lawn and enzymes are like the workers who transport those items into the house.

In other words enzymes are like a “chemical moving company” packing proteins, fats and carbohydrates into boxes and placing them into the rooms they belong.  Even the most beautiful crystal glasses won’t be useful if they just sit there on the lawn. Something has to move them. So consider that your body is the building and enzymes are the movers.

Digestion can’t happen without enzymes No vitamin, mineral or hormone can work without enzymes. Nor can we breathe, eat or walk without enzymes, so when digestion is poor, even the best eating plan won’t work!

Chewing your food releases the enzymes found in saliva which digest food so they can be transported into the correct area of your body. Enzymes are also found in the stomach, intestines and mitochondria.

  • Protease breaks up proteins
  • Amalyse breaks up carbohydrates
  • Lipase breaks up fats
  • Cellulose digest soluble fiber
  • Disaccharidase digest sugars

Digestion begins in the mouth with saliva – the more we chew, the more enzymes we release. Digestion then stimulates the hypothalamus gland, the control center in the brain which regulates daily activities  such as appetite, nervous system, moods and the senses. Powerful, complicated stuff!

And some believe all this “complicated stuff” evolved from mud clumps!

Jer.32:27, “Behold, I am the Lord, the God of all flesh; is anything too difficult for me?”  Honestly now!! Imagine, a man and a woman evolving at the exact same time over the millions of years some believe our earth existed.  Sorry, it takes more faith to believe in that, then it does for me to believe that man was created by a Heavenly Father.

Psalm 139:13-15  “For you created my inmost being;  you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;  your works are wonderful,  I know that full well. My frame was not hidden from you when I was made in the secret place, when I was woven together in the depths of the earth.

Praise God that we are fearfully and wonderfully made! Now go forth and chew!

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2 thoughts on “Oh My Gosh, Were Our Mothers Right?!

  1. Yes, more confirmation I am on the right tract. I worked for 6 months in the medical unit of a detention facility. One of the nurses attend a seminar with her Health-Food-store-owner-sister (unrelated to work). She came back amazed at what she learned about enzymes and chewing our food slowly. That began me trying to do so…I’m a work in progress, now 10 years later, I am doing better!

    Liked by 1 person

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